Is your guitar playing affecting your chances to get your recordings chosen for film and TV licensing opportunities?

by Owen Critchley
LoUdtHud producer/recording artist

“About your playing…”

make your guitar playing better

In today’s post, I’m going to give you one of the best pieces of advice that was ever given to me. The advice was not that big a deal to act on, but the effect it had on the success of my recordings surely was big.

Here’s how it went: “Nice songs. But I assume they’re not done? You know the playing has to be better, right?”

I knew right then that I couldn’t fake my playing anymore. It wasn’t going to fool the people I wanted to work with most. And it wasn’t smart of me to try, especially because it was a simple thing to fix.

 

  • Nowadays, it is even easier. Keep reading why this is so important for your goals in music

 

  • I’ve invited Mark and David to tell you how to quickly get on top of this.

 

  • I told them that I would be writing this post and they were happy to be part of it. They’ve sent a video explaining how they can help which I appreciate very much – (see it at the end of this post).

 

I hear every day the great strides people are taking with their home recording abilities.

 

  • But the truth is, too many songwriters struggle with their musicianship and hope it isn’t noticed and won’t affect the success of their recordings.

 

  • It will be noticed and it is going to prevent your good songs from finding their way to the staggering amount of opportunities in today’s music industry.

Today’s songwriting opportunities are made for us. Shouldn’t we make sure we can take advantage of them?

I’m going to jump up and down a bit to get your attention. So much of the music that music supervisors and licensing companies are describing nowadays might as well be tailor made for today’s home recording artist.

 

  • There are so many projects asking for simple styles that are simple to record and mix. That means, that a song with just guitar and vocal is perfect even for many of the biggest budget film, TV or ad opportunities.

 

Look below at  just a few music and song licensing opportunities that come across my screen every day.

  • For those who have taken the step to be able to play simple, solid guitar tracks, I want to show you a the types that are particularly ripe for home recording artists

 

Music Licensing Company needs BLUES ROCK INSTRUMENTALS for an immediate pitch for an upcoming TV placement. Essentially, they want some dark tones and textures with a modern edge, and a bit of a creepy, deep Southern feel.

We’re even open to listening to Blues/Rock with a Delta Blues spirit. Broadcast Quality is needed (your excellent home recordings are fine).

The estimated license fee for this is $3,000-$5,000

 

A-LIST MUSIC SUPERVISOR working on a Hollywood Feature Film needs Mid-to-Up Tempo Acoustic-Driven Singer/Songwriter songs to play in the background of a scene. A pretty mellow vibe, but we don’t want to put anybody to sleep, and we’re certainly not looking for anyone to get up and start slam dancing. I’m looking for a steadiness to the intensity that will support a scene without getting in the way of the dialogue.” ACOUSTIC-BASED SINGER/SONGWRITER SONGS in the laid-back, stylistic wheelhouse of Ben Harper, Jack Johnson, Brett Dennen, etc., are needed by a Film/TV Music Publisher who’s currently working on several reality TV shows. He needs easygoing and intimate songs, with well-written universal lyrics.

Your playing doesn’t have to be amazing. But it does have to be solid and confident for your recordings.

There are hundreds more opportunities like this out there every single day that are really simple to be prepared for.

 

  • All you have to do is learn to play simple, solid, supportive guitar tracks for your songs and instrumentals.

 

  • If you can do that, you can record and mix songs for licensing opportunities like this in an hour. Just getting your playing to where it’s solid means you can record more songs, more quickly, and be part of more opportunities.

Along with the steps you’ve taken to be able make great sounding home recordings, this is probably the most important thing you can do for a real career in songwriting.

A message from friends, Mark and David to my home recording community:

My constant hope is to see even more of you achieve real success for your songs and recordings.

This really is a great program and such a fantastic opportunity for all of you in my Blueprint home recording community.

As always, all my best to all of you.
Owen Critchley